IT’S ONLY EMPIRICAL WHEN YOU GOT THE TIME SLIP

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The Blue Flame’s design is um, for a layman it’s similar to Breedlove’s. It’s like a dart, you know, the car is designed like a dart and his cars are designed like a dart or an arrow as opposed to say, the Thrust SSC which is, designed like a barn door.

PETE FARNSWORTH: Yeah, massive.

You know and basically “We’re going to push this barn door through this other wall.” Their design slowed considerably when it started getting into trans and subsonic and supersonic regions, but is this a correct design to puncture the sound barrier?

PETE: Yep.

… because the whole idea was to stabilize the car… That’s why they had the two Spey 202s. It wasn’t for thrust, it was to anchor it. If you take your design and get it into those same regions, it could have gotten a little strange.

PETE: It certainly could have.

LEAH: It could have, we never were gonna stand up and go, “We could have done it,” because nobody who has really really been into racing knows that you can say, “You could have.”

So it’s only empirical when you got the time slip.

PETE: Absolutely. We learned that from drag racing a whole bunch of years. You don’t make six changes at once you go a step by step by step by step by step. It takes time, and you don’t how the outcome is gonna be, you just make judgments. Now, with the computers that record a hundred things at once, you know, it’s great they could make several changes and uh, know how they’re, you know what each one is doing, but uh, the thing is you tend not to do it anyway.

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